British holidaymakers seeking hedonism in the sun are being warned they could fined as much as £85,000 if they attend an illegal party in the Balearics. The British Embassy has warned tourists heading for Ibiza and Majorca against going to such gatherings.

It says that while parties at licenced establishments are commonplace across the islands, those that are held in villas and in private homes are illegal. The warning applies to British citizens on holiday in the country and comes following a number of worrying incidents, reports Birmingham Live.

A spokesman for the British Embassy said: “There have been a number of serious accidents involving people attending irregular commercially promoted parties in villas and private homes on the islands of Ibiza and Majorca. Licensed clubs and bars are required to meet safety and security standards, including emergency exits and capacity limits, and to have trained, licensed security staff. Irregular commercial parties may not meet these standards.”

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The government adds: “You should take care of your belongings, ensure you know where emergency exits are located and not take unnecessary risks. Heavy fines may be imposed by local authorities to anyone attending irregular commercial parties.”

The new regulations, which come into force this summer, have been presented by Balearic councillor for the Presidency, Mercedes Garrido, and the president of the Council of Ibiza, Vicent Mari. They are keen to put a stop to illegal parties which have increased “exponentially” in the last two years with the closure of discotheques due to the pandemic, said Marí.

Landlords who rent out properties where these parties are held will also be fined between 100,000 and 300,000 euro, as they will be held responsible for them. Under the new rules financial punishment could filter down to the attendees, with fines of between 300 and 30,000 euro possible depending on the seriousness of the infringement.





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