Venue: Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney Dates: 4-8 January Time: 23:30 GMT
Coverage: Test Match Special and live text commentary, plus clips, features and analysis on the BBC Sport website and app. Daily highlights show on BBC iPlayer from 17:00 GMT

England pace bowler James Anderson says he believed the side “genuinely had a good chance” of beating Australia in the Ashes.

England have lost the five-match series after 12 days of cricket, with a batting collapse in Melbourne handing Australia an unassailable 3-0 lead.

The tourists have lost 12 and drawn one of their past 13 Tests in Australia.

“The first three games have been really gutting. The lads are pretty flat at the minute,” Anderson said.

England were bowled out for 68 on the third day of the third Ashes Test as Australia completed a crushing innings-and-14-run victory.

They have yet to pass 300 with the bat in the series so far and have been bowled out for under 200 three times in six innings.

“I genuinely thought we had a good chance when we came over here,” Anderson, 39, told Test Match Special.

“I thought the squad we’ve got would be able to compete, but it’s clearly not gone to plan.

“The more senior players have to rally round and make sure everyone is in a good headspace to compete because the first three games have been really gutting.”

Anderson, England’s all-time leading Test wicket-taker, missed the first Test with a calf niggle but played in Adelaide and Melbourne.

He has been involved in the past five Ashes campaigns in Australia, including England’s series victory in 2010-11.

However, success has been hard to come by since then, with England losing 5-0 in 2013-14 and 4-0 in 2017-18.

“I think we’ve just got to throw absolutely everything at the next two games,” Anderson added.

“We’re aware that we’ve got so much support and I know people are getting up in the middle of the night watching us as well at home.

“We are just gutted that we’re not performing for those people and giving them what they want to see.”

England’s heavy defeat has also led to questions about the domestic structure and whether it is preparing players properly for Test cricket.

Anderson, who plays county cricket for Lancashire, said he hoped the balance between red and white-ball cricket would be redressed.

“There has been a huge [change of] direction with white-ball cricket and I think that, at the minute, it’s tipped slightly towards white ball,” Anderson added.

“If you look at our performances in Test cricket over the last few years, they’ve been pretty inconsistent.

“So, from that point of view we can hopefully just redress that balance a little bit.”

England coach Chris Silverwood, who has been heavily criticised following England’s defeat, will miss the fourth Test after being forced to isolate for 10 days.

England, who are scheduled to fly to Sydney on Friday, will have a fourth round of PCR tests on Thursday.

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