Millions of people across the UK have received their first Covid-19 vaccination as part of the roll-out.

According to the Office of National Statistics (ONS), this is now more than half of the population.

As a result of having the jab, people will carry Covid-19 antibodies – however they aren’t the only ones, says Wales Online.

Those who have previously had Covid-19 are also likely to test positive for antibodies, but despite this they still need to get the vaccine.

Remember, the Prime Minister had covid last year, but he also had the jab this year.

The NHS says people who have had a positive antibody test or have already had covid should still get vaccinated.

“There is no evidence of any safety concerns from vaccinating individuals with a past history of COVID-19 infection, or with detectable COVID-19 antibody so people who have had COVID-19 disease (whether confirmed or suspected) can still receive the COVID-19 vaccine,” says the NHS.

“You can have the vaccine 28 days after you had a positive test for COVID-19 or 28 days after your symptoms started, so you may need to wait.

Use our vaccine calculator below to see when you may receive your jab:

“People currently unwell and experiencing COVID-19 symptoms should not receive the COVID-19 vaccine until they have recovered.”

If you’re simply curious about whether you’ve already had the virus, but haven’t had a positive virus or antibody test, Birmingham Live said these symptoms could be signs that you have – but should still get vaccinated.

Cough – with a difference

Persistent coughs are a common sign that you may have had coronavirus. Typically, these sound different to the usual cough you’ll get – and they even differ from ‘smokers cough’ too.

Red eyes

The College of Optometrists said: “It is recognised that any upper respiratory tract infection may result in viral conjunctivitis as a secondary complication, and this is also the case with Covid.

“However, it is unlikely that a person would present with viral conjunctivitis secondary to Covid without other symptoms of fever or a continuous cough as conjunctivitis seems to be a late feature where is has occurred.”

Breathlessness

Dyspnea – the term for when someone has difficulty breathing – may be coupled with a tightness in the chest, rapid breathing and heart palpitations.

Stomach trouble

A study by the American Journal of Gastroenterology linked stomach and digestive problems to Covid. It found that 48.5% of 204 people who had covid in China’s Hubei province also reported digestive symptoms such as diarrhoea.

Fatigue

Fatigue and tiredness – sometimes for months after infection – can be a symptom of Covid.

Brain fog

Long Covid sufferers have reported experiencing ‘brain fog’ for months after having the virus.

High temperature

A high temperature is considered a fever when it reaches 37.7C (100F).

Sudden loss of taste or smell

The three official symptoms of Covid-19 listed by the NHS include a persistent, hard-to-shift cough, which develops quickly.

Others include a sudden loss of taste or smell, which was the third official symptom discovered by the likes of the NHS and WHO.

Other signs include a fever or high temperature.

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